The 2010 tick season was very unusual because there were very few bats getting tick paralysis, and consequently not very many orphans coming into care either. The La Nina weather conditions contributed to Austrralia's wettest Spring on record, making it difficult for the ticks to be out questing for flying mammals.

The ticks were also producing a particularly toxic neurotoxin and animals were often admitted in good condition, only to deteriorate rapidly and die or be euthanased. This seemed to be a problem also for veterinarains treating cats and dogs in many places down the east coast. About a third of all adults admitted with tick paralysis seemed to be affected by this more stringer neurotoxin.

We had about 100 orphans come into care, where normally we get 250-500. Two of the orphans had tick paralysis, both with the ticks on their wing membrane. We've observed over the yeras that when ticks attach to the wing rather than the body of a bat the survival rate is better.

The main October/November team, left to right: Ashleigh, Pamela, Amy, Abie, Kate, Jenny, Clare.

  group
     

SEPTEMBER OCTOBER 2010
Anneke Hermans NZ
Abie Meddings UK
Kate Hubbard UK
Clare Stalfod UK
Amy Green UK
Pamela Drury Australia





 


NOVEMBER DECEMBER 2010
Abie Meddings UK
Kate Hubbard UK
Clare Stalfod UK
Amy Green UK
Pamela Drury Australia
Sarah
Erica and Sonya, Austria
Kirra and Janet
Kelly Kovde USA
Susanne Holtz, Germany
Gemma Carroll
Chrissy Crebas
Graeme Taylor


JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH 2011 Susanne Holtz, Germany
Gemma Carroll
Chrissy Crebas
Graeme Taylor|
Steve and Lyn Amesbury
Mikki Law
Justin Byrne
Mary Crichton, Australia


 


camping
Many volunteers prefer their own 3 metre by 3 metre gazebo tent to sleeping in the volunteer room.This year has been very wet but the tents have mostly remained dry. The shipping container on the edge of the photo helps store a lot of bat equipment.
micromum
Larry is a bat hospital volunteer who works at a local banana farm. Towards the end of the year it is not unusual for a bunch of bananas to come into the packing shed with Nyctophilus bifax mothers with young. Sometimes the mothers fly off. This year we had 2 mothers, both with twins on board, and 4 orphans. They are a lot of work to rear, but thankfully we had Abie to lead the microbat team.
Monty
Monty is a young fishing bat Myotis adversus who also came into care.
coffee
Kate removing coffee seedlings. Feral coffee is a major weed problem at the Lakeside colony. It forms dense thickets that made our task of finding tick paralysis bats very difficult. It is already dominating certain sections of the forest and we are working with Council to help remove it all.

 

We eat very well at the Bat Hospital and it's not unusual to have up to 12 people to feed at night. All volunteers take turn to prepare meals and clean up afterwards.   dinner